Research, Reviews, & Updates

The ESPC provides research, reviews, and updates on a range of social issues

Identifying Issues in the Treatment of Youth in Conflict with the Law at the Youth Restorative Action Project

Identifying Issues in the Treatment of Youth in Conflict with the Law at the Youth Restorative Action Project

This paper identifies the issues surrounding the treatment of youth in conflict with the law, from the perspective of youth and youth workers at the Youth Restorative Action Project (YRAP). The objectives of treatment are the reintegration of youth within their community, and reducing the re-offence rates. The paper compares the perspectives of the individuals at YRAP to current best practices, and offers recommendations in the treatment of youth in conflict with the law. A brief overview of current best practices revealed that program integrity and a program length of less than six months was correlated with lower rates of re-offence. The practice of Restorative Justice approaches was effective for lowering rates of re-offence, and left both victim and offender participants more satisfied than those that did not participate in such programs. The involvement of youth in the development of personalized treatment was also deemed important. Finally, collaboration between service organizations, especially in the form of Wraparound services, was recommended in the literature.

In 2015, Andrew Ha served as the Edmonton Social Planning Council’s Social Justice Intern. Our Social Justice Intern is a volunteer program, which provides students at an Albertan post-secondary institution the opportunity to complete a research project on a local social issue. This initiative is supported by Volunteer Alberta’s Serving Communities Internship Program (SCIP). The following report is the result of his work in this position.

Disclaimer: This report does not necessarily reflect the views of the Edmonton Social Planning Council, but is based on the work and opinions of the author.

For more information about the ESPC’s Social Justice Internship, you can reach us at the following address:

Social Justice Internship
Edmonton Social Planning Council
Suite 37, 9912-106 St. Edmonton, AB T5K 1C5
Phone: 780-423-2031
www.edmontonsocialplanning.ca

Download Identifying Issues in the Treatment of Youth in Conflict with the Law at the Youth Restorative Action Project here!

 

Research Update May 2016

The Edmonton Social Planning Council’s Research Review contains summaries of the latest social research publications. We keep up on your reading so you don't have to.

Inside this issue:

“An Analysis of the Economic Circumstances of Canadian Seniors” reviewed by Natividad (Natty) Klimo

“Beyond Survival: A Qualitative Study of the Impact of Homelessness and Incarceration on Women’s Health” reviewed by Lauren Melnyk

“Creating a Community Strategy to End Youth Homelessness in Edmonton” reviewed by Élise Hervieux

“Ending Homelessness? A Critical Examination of Housing First in Canada and Winnipeg” reviewed by Shez Kassam

“Taking a leap of faith: Meaningful participation of people with experiences of homelessness in solutions to address homelessness” reviewed by Dylan Klemen

Click to download our May 2016 Research Update!

Research Update April 2016—Issues in Inequality

The Edmonton Social Planning Council’s Research Review contains summaries of the latest social research publications. We keep up on your reading so you don't have to.

Inside this issue:

“Aboriginal Seniors’ Housing in Edmonton” reviewed by Jennifer Taylor

“Better is Always Possible: A Federal Plan to Tackle Poverty and Inequality” reviewed by Lexia Simmons

“Framing the New Inequality: The Politics of Income Redistribution in Canada” reviewed by Jamil Harvich

“Trends in Income Inequality in Canada and Elsewhere” reviewed by Emily Speur

Click to download Research Update April 2016—Issues in Inequality

The Path Forward: Opportunities to End Child Poverty in Alberta

The past year has been one of dramatic political and economic change in Alberta.

There were changes in governments at the provincial and federal levels. Both Alberta’s economy and public finances are being negatively impacted by the collapse in energy prices with the prospect of only modest recovery in the foreseeable future.

Despite these challenges, the new Alberta government has made some promising investments in poverty reduction. Many of these investments have been championed by Alberta anti-poverty advocates for many years.

It will take more than money to end child poverty in this province. Yet, without additional investment in key solutions, the goal of ending child poverty will not be achieved.

This marks the fifth year of a collaboration between the Edmonton Social Planning Council, Public Interest Alberta, and the Alberta College of Social Workers. The purpose of this report is to do a checkup of child and family poverty in this province, and identify the most effective ways of ending it.

This report contains updated information on the extent of child and family poverty in Alberta. Data on child poverty numbers and rates in this year’s report is from compilations by Statistics Canada from tax returns filed by Alberta families.

The Path Forward: Opportunities to End Child Poverty in Alberta

December Research Review—Issues in Canadian Public Policy No. 4

Inside The Cover:

  1. City of Edmonton. (2015). Ending Poverty in a Generation. EndPoverty Task-force.
  2. Office of the Auditor General of Canada. (2015). Access to Health Services for Remote First Nation Communities. House of Commons Canada
  3. Noble, A. (2015). Beyond Housing First: A Holistic Response to Family Home-lessness in Canada. Raising the Roof.
  4. Johal, S., & Granofsky, T. (2015). Growing Pains: Childcare in Canada. Mowat Centre
  5. McIntruff, K., & Lockhart, C. (2015). The Best and Worst Places to be a Women in Canada 2015. Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives
  6. Teeluck, K. (2015). The Invisible Victims: Examining the Impacts of a Minimum Residency Requirement for Social Assistance on Refugee Claimants. Citizens for Public Justice.
  7. Allan, B., & Smylie, J. (2015). First Peoples, Second Class Treatment: The Role of Racism in the health and well-being of Indigenous Peoples in Canada (Discussion Paper) (Non-Governmental Organization). Wellesley Institute.

Download the December 2015 Research Review—Issues in Canadian Public Policy here!