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A.06.F TRACKING THE TRENDS

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Created Date Thursday, 19 November 2015
Modified Date Tuesday, 28 February 2017
Filesize 5.79 Megabytes

Tracking the Trends 2015

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The Edmonton Social Planning Council (ESPC) today released the 2015 edition of its flagship publication Tracking the Trends. The 128-page publication provides a detailed analysis of social and economic trends in Edmonton. Information is provided about population demographics, education and employment, living costs & housing, income & wealth, and poverty trends that together comprise the social health of Edmontonians.

Whether planning programs or developing policies, timely accurate information is critical to informed decision-making,” said John Kolkman, the ESPC’s Research Coordinator. “Tracking the Trends is a one-stop resource for identifying and analyzing a broad range of social and economic trends impacting those with low and modest incomes in our community,” he added.

An overarching message in this year’s Tracking the Trends is that—following several years of strong employment and income growth—Edmonton is entering a period of increased uncertainty due to a collapse in oil and natural gas prices. The impact of this change is starting to show up in some of the trends we follow,” noted Kolkman.

Kolkman highlighted several key Edmonton trends reflecting this uncertainty:

  • Job growth has leveled off so far in 2015, following several years of strong growth (p. 21);
  • The number of people receiving Employment Insurance regular benefits is up 55.1% in the first eight months of 2015, compared to the level in 2014 (p. 79);
  • A 9.1% increase in the number of Edmonton households receiving Alberta Works (social assistance) benefits in the first nine months of 2015, compared to the 2014 average (p. 77);
  • 14,794 individuals were served by Edmonton’s Food Bank in March 2015, up 15.4% compared to a year earlier (p. 37);
  • At 4.2% in October 2015, the rental vacancy rate is up significantly, meaning increased availability. Rents are still up 2.2% from a year earlier to $1,259 per month for a two-bedroom unit (p. 32).

Tracking the Trends 2015 also identifies a number of concerning trends:

  • 128,810 people in metro Edmonton lived in poverty in 2013, 10.5% of the population. 41,640 were children and youth under 18, 15.2% of all children and youth (pp. 72, 74);
  • While median family incomes are up overall, much of this increase has gone to the highest income earners. Since 1982, the top 1% of Edmonton taxfilers have seen their after-tax incomes, after accounting for inflation, go up by 53.4% compared to only a 5.9% increase for the bottom 50% of taxfilers (p. 52);
  • There continues to be a significant income gap based on gender. In 2013, female taxfilers median total income was $31,460 compared to $55,060 for male taxfilers (p. 46).
  • In 2011, 59.2% of poor children lived in families where at least one parent works full-time for the full-year. A job is not necessarily a ticket out of poverty (p. 70); and
  • There was a 6.2% increase in homelessness between October 2012 and October 2014. There is also a trend toward an increased number of youth experiencing homelessness (p. 36). The number of homeless people is still down 25.1% from its October 2008 peak.

Kolkman said the report also finds many positive trends:

  • The steady improvement in educational attainment as measured by high school completion and post-secondary attainment continues. However, almost one in five young adults fails to complete high school within five years showing room for further improvement (p. 27);
  • Compared to other Canadian urban centres, Edmonton has a relatively young population with a median age of 35.9 (p. 4). This sets the stage for more people making an economic contribution in the future;
  • Government income transfers lifted 53,960 Alberta children and youth above the poverty line in 2013 (p. 67);
  • Aboriginals 15 years and older earn a slightly higher percentage of their income from employment (82%) compared to the total Edmonton population (81%) (p. 50); and
  • Reductions in the number of Edmonton children in government care due to a focus on supporting children in their birth families (p. 94); and
  • Employment earnings provide the main source of income for all family types including lone parents (p. 48).

Tracking the Trends 2015 combines 22 key indicators grouped into 5 categories into a Social Health Index (pp. 106-111). Categories where Edmonton does well are financial security and personal & family stability. Edmonton is doing more poorly on population health and participation & environmental indicators.

The bottom line is a 20.1% improvement in Edmonton’s social health since the year 2000. During this time period, Edmonton’s social health improved at a more rapid rate than the 14.5% growth in Alberta GDP per person,” Kolkman concluded.

Created Date Wednesday, 13 February 2013
Modified Date Tuesday, 28 February 2017
Filesize 10.16 Megabytes

Tracking the Trends 2013

To get your copy of the 2013 Tracking the Trends, click here Publication Mail In Order Form or use the PayPal option below.

Whether for planning programs and services, or developing policies, timely, accurate information is critical. Likewise, an understanding of the historical context of social issues is critical to the development of effective strategies for positive social change.

Presenting data in a single source, such as Tracking the Trends, permits us to see the trends in the context of other social changes occurring simultaneously. For example, the Consumer Price Index and average rents have risen at a more rapid rate than Alberta Works benefits. This means an erosion of living standards for vulnerable Albertans relying on these benefits.

Most Canadian publications present data at the national or provincial level. Tracking the Trends includes primarily Edmonton-level data. This makes it a useful tool for people working on social issues in Edmonton and the surrounding region.

A Tool for the Public

Edmontonians’ awareness of social issues is critical to improving the inclusiveness of our communities. A better understanding of the challenges our fellow citizens face can affect the way we think of and treat each other. Regardless of our backgrounds, we all share this city and region, and have an interest in its healthy future.

A Tool for Decision-Makers

For a planner or policy maker, this collection of data provides a clearer understanding of the current and historical social conditions in Edmonton. This information can provide the background necessary to make informed decisions, and even the insight needed to anticipate future changes.

We encourage readers to use Tracking the Trends to assess how well all levels of government are fulfilling their role in ensuring citizens have the support they need to maintain a decent standard of living.

A Tool for Social Organizations and Researchers

The work of organizations involved in social development activities must be informed by the current and historical context. The information in Tracking the Trends will prove useful for program planning, organizational strategy-building, as well as other community development activities.

Students and researchers will also benefit from this rich and unified source of data to inform their research projects. Such in-depth research is important for expanding our knowledge of specific issues and informing social policy development.

Created Date Sunday, 13 February 2011
Modified Date Tuesday, 28 February 2017
Filesize 12.36 Megabytes

Tracking The Trends 2011: Edmonton's Increasing Diversity

To get your copy of Tracking the Trends, click here Publication Mail In Order Form or use the PayPal option below.

Whether for planning programs and services, or developing policies, timely, accurate information is critical. Likewise, an understanding of the historical context of social issues is critical to the development of effective strategies for positive social change.

Presenting data in a single source, such as Tracking the Trends, permits us to see the trends in the context of other social changes occurring simultaneously. For example, the Consumer Price Index and average rents have risen at a more rapid rate than Alberta Works benefits. This means an erosion of living standards for vulnerable Albertans relying on these benefits.

Most Canadian publications present data at the national or provincial level. Tracking the Trends includes primarily Edmonton-level data. This makes it a useful tool for people working on social issues in Edmonton and the surrounding region.

A Tool for the Public

Edmontonians’ awareness of social issues is critical to improving the inclusiveness of our communities. A better understanding of the challenges our fellow citizens face can affect the way we think of and treat each other. Regardless of our backgrounds, we all share this city and region, and have an interest in its healthy future.

A Tool for Decision-Makers

For a planner or policy maker, this collection of data provides a clearer understanding of the current and historical social conditions in Edmonton. This information can provide the background necessary to make informed decisions, and even the insight needed to anticipate future changes.

We encourage readers to use Tracking the Trends to assess how well all levels of government are fulfilling their role in ensuring citizens have the support they need to maintain a decent standard of living.

A Tool for Social Organizations and Researchers

The work of organizations involved in social development activities must be informed by the current and historical contexts. The information in Tracking the Trends will prove useful for program planning, organizational strategy-building, as well as other community development activities.

Students and researchers will also benefit from this rich and unified source of data to inform their research projects. Such in-depth research is important for expanding our knowledge of specific issues and informing social policy development.

Created Date Friday, 13 February 2009
Modified Date Tuesday, 28 February 2017
Filesize 3.93 Megabytes

Tracking the Trends 2009: Neighbourhood Well-Being in Edmonton

Purchase the full-colour report with analysis and data tables TODAY ($8.50/copy Shipping Included) via Publication Mail In Order Form or use the PayPal option below.

Whether for planning programs and services, or developing policies, timely, accurate information is critical. Likewise, an understanding of the historical context of social issues is critical to the development of effective strategies for positive social change.

Presenting data in a central source, such as Tracking the Trends, permits us to see the trends in the context of other social changes occurring simultaneously. For example, that the Consumer Price Index and average rents have risen at a more rapid rate than Alberta Works benefits.

Most Canadian publications present data at the national or provincial level. Tracking the Trends is unique in its inclusion of primarily Edmonton-level data. This makes it a useful tool for people working on social issues in the Edmonton metropolitan region.

A Tool for the Public

Edmontonians’ awareness of social issues is critical to improving the social inclusiveness of our communities. A better understanding of the challenges that our fellow citizens face can affect the way we think of and treat each other. Regardless of our socioeconomic backgrounds, we all share this city and region, and have an interest in its healthy future.

A Tool for Decision-Makers

As a planner or policy maker, this collection of data provides a clearer understanding of the current and historical social conditions in Edmonton. This information can provide the background necessary to make informed decisions, and even the insight needed to anticipate future changes.

We encourage readers to use Tracking the Trends to assess how well all levels of government are fulfilling their role in ensuring that its citizens have the support they need to maintain a decent standard of living.

A Tool for Social Organizations and Researchers

The work of organizations involved in social development activities must be informed by the current and historical social contexts. The information in Tracking the Trends will prove useful for program planning, organizational strategy-building, as well as other community development activities.

Students and researchers will also benefit from this rich and unified source of data to inform their research projects. Such in-depth research is important for expanding our knowledge of specific issues and informing social policy development.

Created Date Tuesday, 13 February 2007
Modified Date Tuesday, 28 February 2017
Filesize 6.37 Megabytes

Tracking The Trends 2007: Social Health in Edmonton

Whether planning programs and services, or developing policies, timely, accurate information is critical. Likewise, an understanding of the historical context of social issues is critical to the development of effective strategies for positive social change.

Presenting data in a central source permits us to see the trends in the context of many other social changes occurring simultaneously. For example, that the Consumer Price Index and average rents have risen steadily, while welfare rates have fallen.

Most Canadian publications present data at the national or provincial level. Tracking the Trends data focuses primarily on the Edmonton metropolitan region.

A Tool for Decision-Makers

As a planner, policy maker or analyst, this collection of data provides a clearer understanding of the present and historical social conditions in Edmonton. This information can provide the background necessary to make informed decisions, and even the insight needed to anticipate future changes.

We encourage readers to use Tracking the Trends to assess how well governments are fulfilling their role in ensuring that its citizens have the support they need to maintain a decent standard of living.

A Tool for Social Organizations and Researchers

Much like decision-makers, the work of organizations involved in social development activities must be informed by the current and historical social contexts. The information in Tracking the Trends may prove useful for program planning, organizational strategy-building, as well as any other community development activities.

Students and researchers will also benefit from this rich and unified source of data to inform their research projects, which can penetrate the issues in much greater detail. Our hope is that such research will further inform social policy development.

A Tool for the Public

Public awareness is critical to improving the social inclusiveness of our communities. A better understanding of the challenges and inequities that our fellow citizens face can inform the way we think of and treat each other. Regardless of our socioeconomic backgrounds, we all share this city and region, and have an interest in its healthy future.

Created Date Tuesday, 26 November 2002
Modified Date Tuesday, 28 February 2017
Filesize 188 Kilobytes

2002 Tracking The Trends - Social Health in Edmonton

Title: Tracking the Trends: Social health in Edmonton: The cost of healthy living.
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Subject: Poverty - statistics
Publisher: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication: Edmonton
Date of Publication: 2002
Language: English
Series: Tracking the Trends
Material Type: Report

Created Date Sunday, 26 November 2000
Modified Date Tuesday, 28 February 2017
Filesize 5.88 Megabytes

2000 June Tracking The Trends - Social Health in Edmonton The Cost of Healthy Living

Title: Tracking the trends: Social Health in Edmonton: The cost of healthy living.
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Subject: Poverty - statistics
Publisher: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication: Edmonton
Date of Publication: 2000
Language: English
Series: Tracking the Trends
Material Type: Report

Created Date Sunday, 13 August 1995
Modified Date Tuesday, 28 February 2017
Filesize 2.28 Megabytes

1995 Tracking The Trends - Special Feature on Mental Health

Title: Tracking the Trends: Future Directions for Human Services in Edmonton: Special feature on mental health.
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Subject: Health issues - mental health
Publisher: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication: Edmonton
Date of Publication: 1995
Language: English
Series: Tracking the Trends
Material Type: Report

Created Date Saturday, 13 August 1994
Modified Date Tuesday, 28 February 2017
Filesize 3.24 Megabytes

Tracking The Trends 1994: Future Directions for Human Services in Edmonton and the Surrounding Region

Title: Tracking The Trends 1994: Future Directions for Human Services in Edmonton and the Surrounding Region
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Subject: Major social and economic trends; Trends and implications for youth
Publisher: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication: Edmonton
Date of Publication: 1994
Language: English
Material Type: Report

Created Date Friday, 23 July 1993
Modified Date Tuesday, 28 February 2017
Filesize 1.57 Megabytes

Tracking The Trends 1993 - Future Directions for Human Services in Edmonton

Title: Tracking the Trends: Future Directions for Human Services in Edmonton: Special feature on aboriginal people.
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Subject: Indigenous peoples - programs, services
Publisher: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication: Edmonton
Date of Publication: 1993
Language: English
Material Type: Report

Created Date Friday, 09 November 1990
Modified Date Tuesday, 28 February 2017
Filesize 213 Kilobytes

1990 November Trends for the 1990s - Keeping Our Fingers on the Pulse

Title: Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Publisher: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication: Edmonton
Date of Publication: 1990
Language: English
Material Type: Report

Created Date Monday, 25 June 1990
Modified Date Tuesday, 28 February 2017
Filesize 1.53 Megabytes

Tracking The Trends 1990 - Special Feature on Families with Children

Title: Tracking the Trends: Future Directions for Human Services in Edmonton Special feature on families with children.
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Subject: Children - statistics, Family - statistics, Statistics - Edmonton
Publisher: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication: Edmonton
Date of Publication: 1990
Language: English
Series: Tracking the Trends
Material Type: Report

Created Date Sunday, 11 June 1989
Modified Date Tuesday, 28 February 2017
Filesize 1.90 Megabytes

Tracking The Trends 1989 - Special Feature on Youth and Seniors

Title: Tracking the Trends: Future Directions for Human Services in Edmonton: A special feature on youth and seniors.
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Subject: Youth - statistics, Seniors - general, Statistics - Edmonton
Publisher: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication: Edmonton
Date of Publication: 1989
Language: English
Series: Tracking the Trends
Material Type: Report

ESPC headquarters also feature a library, where hard-copies of a number of publications are stored. Everyone is welcome to browse the materials;memberscan borrow items.  Individuals looking for a quiet research spot or groups looking for a comfortable meeting space can contact us to book time in the library.

Hours: 9:00am–4:30pm, Monday to Friday        Photocopies: 10 cents per page.

Is there something missing from our library? Are you looking for help with your research? We'd love to hear from you!  Email johnk@edmontonsocialplanning.ca or call 780.423.2031 x 350

 

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