Digital Resource Library

Your Research Hub.

Our Resource section is an information hub for Alberta's third sector. We collect publications for, by, and about nonprofits and social services in our province. Start your search using keywords in the search box below or browse the various categories.

 

D. HOUSING

Documents

Created Date Friday, 12 October 2012
Filesize 345 Bytes

2012 Understanding Tenancy Failures and Successes

Created Date Tuesday, 15 March 2016
Modified Date Wednesday, 01 March 2017
Filesize 35 Kilobytes

Enhancing Streets to Homes Appendix E

Title: Enhancing streets to homes service to address the needs of people who are street involved, including those who panhandle: Appendix E
Corporate Author: City of Toronto
Subject: Housing - temporary, emergency, homelessness
Publisher: City of Toronto
Place of Publication: Toronto
Date of Publication: 2008
Abstract: Summary of program responses to address panhandling that have been implemented in jurisdictions across North America
Language: English
Material Type: Report

Created Date Friday, 06 June 2014
Modified Date Wednesday, 01 March 2017
Filesize 490 Kilobytes

2014 Infill Action Plan (Draft) City of Edmonton

Keeping our city and our established neighbourhoods thriving into the future. Providing diverse housing options for our residents. Using our resources wisely.

This is what residential infill in Edmonton is all about. People, homes, and our evolving communities.

More and more people are calling Edmonton home. By 2024 we will have a population of over one million. One million people and thousands of households with different housing preferences and needs: young and old, big and small, new Edmontonians and residents who have lived their whole lives in our city. Supporting residential infill in established neighbourhoods is an important way to help everyone find the right homes in the right communities.

Infill also helps our established neighbourhoods. Each of them has changed over time and will continue to evolve into the future. New homes, different types of housing and new residents will help ensure their ongoing vitality.

Created Date Sunday, 06 April 2014
Modified Date Wednesday, 01 March 2017
Filesize 279 Kilobytes

Edmonton’s 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness - Year 5 Update

Created Date Thursday, 13 February 2014
Modified Date Saturday, 15 February 2014
Filesize 764 Kilobytes

Not Just A Roof Over Our Heads

Exploring the state of rental housing in Edmonton one Year later.

 

Executive Summary

The Edmonton Social Planning Council (ESPC) conducted a survey of renters in the Edmonton area from April

16 to May 31, 2008. The survey was created as a follow up to the Renters’ Listening Forums held in May 2007

in response to the rental housing crisis at the time. The intention of the Edmonton Renters’ Survey was to

explore how the rental housing situation has changed over the past year. A diverse group of 727 renters

responded to the survey; their responses provided detailed insights, both quantitative and qualitative, into the

eight questions derived from some of the key issues identified at the 2007 forums.

Created Date Tuesday, 01 January 2013
Modified Date Thursday, 04 May 2017
Filesize 639 Kilobytes

Asking for directions : partnering with youth to build the evidence base for runaway and homeless youth services

Title: Asking for directions : partnering with youth to build the evidence base for runaway and homeless youth services.
Collection: Alberta
Author(s): Schweitzer, Don | Helmer, Chris | Lee, Lorna | Linderman, Matt | Moore, David |Schwiegeraht, Crystal
Citation:All CAS Faculty Scholarship. Paper 53
Subject: Housing - temporary, emergency, homelessness | Youth - planning, policy
Publisher: Pacific University
Date of Publication: 2013
Abstract:

Each year it is estimated that almost 2 million American youth run away from home, are thrown out of their homes, or otherwise end up homeless. As concerning as those numbers are, the risks runaway and homeless youth are exposed to when they find themselves on the street are even more so. Running away from home dramatically increases the risk of victimization, both physically and sexually. Moreover, youth living on the streets exhibit much higher health risks including higher rates of substance abuse, suicide attempts, sexually transmitted disease, pregnancy and death. Because runaway and homeless youth find themselves lacking skills and resources necessary to fully engage in employment, they are left with few legally permissible options for survival.

The research literature has addressed many aspects of the lives of runaway and homeless youth (RHY): the history, policy, practice and research but has neglected youth perspectives on their needs. The complexities associated with the RHY population such as age, pathways to running away and/or homelessness, mental health, abuse, neglect, etc. make this a challenging field to work in. Yet understanding these complexities and evaluating the interventions used by community social service programs designed to help youth return home, or enter other safe, stable housing, is critical to helping this field develop and improve interventions, programs, and prevention strategies that will be used by this uniquely vulnerable population.

In 1974, Congress first passed the Runaway Youth Act (RYA) providing funding for community shelter programs called Basic Centers. In subsequent years Transitional Living Programs (1988) and Street Outreach services (1994) were added to the act. Unfortunately, researchers, youth advocates, and many service providers report that the vast majority of runaway and homeless youth reject the services and programs designed to meet their needs and keep them safe. This dynamic exacerbates an already perilous situation for youth who find themselves on the streets.

Much of the research to date has focused on the pathology of youth and/or their families. This project suggests that if to understand the complexities of these youth and move toward a system with improved utilization rates, we should begin by asking – what are programs doing that work for RHY? Which services or practices do the youth feel are most helpful? Is there a way to synthesize these practices, codify them, and begin to build the evidence base for working effectively with RHY?

This study began this process by conducting 14 focus groups with 52 youth ages 14 – 21, who were receiving services from a Basic Center (3), a drop-in center (3), a street outreach program (2), or a Transitional Living Program (6), and asking them what is it about this program that works for you? Then the researcher hired RHY to analyze those responses. Findings hold the potential to begin filling the chasm that exists in the literature around effective practice with RHY.[Taken from report]

Language: English
Physical Description: 22 p.
Web Site: http://commons.pacificu....le=1053&context=casfac
Material Type: Report

Created Date Thursday, 31 October 2013
Modified Date Wednesday, 01 March 2017
Filesize 1.70 Megabytes

Street Outreach Team: Two Years in Review

Boyle Street Community Services Street Outreach Team has been operating for over two years now reaching out to homeless individuals in 6 high needs areas of the city. ESPC has been a supporter from the beginning, sitting on the advisory committee and on one occasion accompanied the workers on a walk through the river valley to meet some of the folks living in tents. Though the work at time may be daunting, the concept behind the Outreach Workers work is simple: it’s through positive interaction and rapport building that relationships are forged. It may start out with giving someone a bottle of water or clean dry socks, but ultimately, the staff are working toward helping the person find and keep permanent housing.

Created Date Saturday, 12 October 2013
Filesize 1.70 Megabytes

2013 MHCHS Progress Report

Title:Starting at Home in Medicine Hat- Our 5 Year Plan to End Homelessness: year 3 progress report.
Corporate Author: Medicine Hat Community Housing Society
Subject:Housing - affordable, social housing|split|Housing - temporary, emergency, homelessness
Publisher:Medicine Hat Community Housing Society
Place of Publication:Medicine Hat, AB
Date of Publication:2013
Abstract:

This report looks at progress made during the implementation of Medicine Hat's 5 Year Plan to End Homelessness.

Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Saturday, 12 October 2013
Filesize 606 Kilobytes

2013 Homelessness Urban Aboriginal People

Title:Homelessness, urban aboriginal people, and the need for a national enumeration
Author(s):Belanger, Yale D.|split|Awosoga, Olu|split|Weasel Head, Gabrielle
Citation:aboriginal policy studies, Vol. 2, No. 2
Subject:Indigenous peoples - inner city|split|Indigenous peoples - planning, policy|split|Indigenous peoples - programs, services|split|Housing - temporary, emergency, homelessness

Publisher:University of Alberta. Faculty of Native Studies
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:2013
Abstract:

The growing rate of urban Aboriginal homelessness is a concern in Canada, yet, to date, no national enumeration of the homeless community has been attempted. Consequently, policies implemented to guarantee vulnerable populations access to housing are being struck in the absence of reliable data. Obtaining good data on the prevalence of this homeless community is one step in improving our collective understanding and response to urban Aboriginal homelessness. According to our calculations, that homelessness is staggering: on any one night, 6.97 percent of the urban Aboriginal population in Canada is homeless, as compared to a national average of .78 percent. This paper highlights the academic and bureaucratic construction of homelessness while urging academics and front-line agencies to align their research agendas in order to help combat the issues that create homelessness in what is a uniquely challenging environment for urban Aboriginal individuals seeking services. The paper concludes with a series of recommendations that will assist in this matter.[Taken from report]

Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Saturday, 12 October 2013
Filesize 636 Kilobytes

2013 Understanding Tenancy Failures and Successes

Created Date Sunday, 31 March 2013
Modified Date Wednesday, 01 March 2017
Filesize 709 Kilobytes

Alberta Provincial Shelter Data 2012-13

Title: Alberta Provincial Shelter Data 2012-13
Collection: Alberta
Corporate Author: Alberta Council of Women's Shelters
Subject: Housing - temporary, emergency, homelessness | Women - programs, services | Women - sexual assault, violence against women
Publisher: Alberta Council of Women's Shelters
Place of Publication: Edmonton
Date of Publication: 2013
Abstract: This report contains statistics on the use of women’s shelters in the province between April 1, 2012 and March 31, 2013. The statistics show that there is an increasing demand on Albertan women’s shelters because of the lack of accessible support for abused women and their children. Between April 2012 and March 2013, the number of women admitted to women's shelters in the province decreased by approximately 200. However, the number of women that were turned away from shelters during that period is substantially higher than it was during the previous year.
Language: English
Material Type: Report

Created Date Friday, 12 October 2012
Filesize 1.95 Megabytes

2012 CHF Winter 2012

Title:Point-in-time count report: Winter 2012.
Corporate Author: Calgary Homeless Foundation
Subject:Housing - temporary, emergency, homelessness
Publisher:Calgary Homeless Foundation
Place of Publication:Calgary
Date of Publication:2012
Abstract:

On January 18, 2012, the CHF in partnership with several organizations conducted the first PIT Count since 2008. Data was collected from service providers and a comprehensive street enumeration was undertaken to capture as accurate a number as possible. Approximately 160 volunteers canvassed 28 street ‘zones’ or known areas for rough sleepers (those sleeping outside). Mobile teams in vehicles led by Calgary Police Services, City of Calgary Animal and Bylaw Services and street outreach workers covered seven remote city areas while public and private sector partners added six additional areas including Fish Creek Park. Eighty organizations provided data and basic demographics in conjunction with the street count. This report documents their findings. [Taken from report]

Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Friday, 12 October 2012
Filesize 646 Kilobytes

2012 Housing First Report

Title:Housing first: where's the evidence?
Author(s):Waegemakers Schiff, Jeannette|split|Rook, John
Corporate Author: University of Calgary Faculty of Social Work
Subject:Housing - planning, policy|split|Housing - studies, surveys|split|Housing - temporary, emergency, homelessness
Publisher:Homeless Hub Press
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:2012
Abstract:

This literature review looks at housing first programs in North America and whether or not they are reducing homelessness.

Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Friday, 12 October 2012
Modified Date Wednesday, 29 March 2017
Filesize 542 Kilobytes

Downtown Street Outreach Initiative Final Evaluation Report

Title: Downtown Street Outreach Initiative Final Evaluation Report
Variant Title: Downtown [Edmonton] street outreach initiative
Corporate Author: Alana LaPerle Project Services
Subject: Housing - affordable, social housing, Housing - planning, policy, Housing - temporary, emergency, homelessness LaPerle Project Services
Place of Publication: Sherwood Park, AB
Date of Publication: 2012
Abstract: This report describes the objectives and outcomes of the Downtown Street Outreach Initiative. This project was designed to help homeless individuals in Edmonton make the transition from living on the street to adopting a more stable lifestyle, to help community stakeholders learn more about this group and the unique challenges they face, and to become more aware of service gaps and systemic barriers that homeless individuals in Edmonton experience.
Notes: This project was coordinated by Edmonton Police Services, the Downtown Business Association and Boyle Street Community Services.
Language: English
Material Type: Report

Created Date Wednesday, 12 October 2011
Modified Date Wednesday, 29 March 2017
Filesize 405 Kilobytes

Who Pays, When, and How? Government-Assisted Housing in the Northwest Territories and the Role of the Federal Government

Title: Who Pays, When, and How? Government-Assisted Housing in the Northwest Territories and the Role of the Federal Government
Author(s): Falvo, Nick
Editor: Stoney, Christopher, & Doern, G. Bruce
Citation: No. 32. [Taken from the book "How Ottawa spends: 2011-2012 : Trimming fat or slicing pork?"]
Subject: Housing - affordable, social housing; Housing - planning, policy|split|Housing - studies, surveys
Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press
Place of Publication: Montréal QC, Kingston, ON
Date of Publication: 2011
Abstract: This chapter discusses the state of housing in the Northwest Territories, with a particular focus on public housing for low-income citizens.
Language: English
Series: How Ottawa Spends Series
Material Type: Chapter

Created Date Thursday, 06 October 2011
Modified Date Wednesday, 29 March 2017
Filesize 5.58 Megabytes

Report Card on Ending Homelessness in Ottawa: Jan to Dec 2010

Title: Report Card on Ending Homelessness in Ottawa: Jan to Dec 2010
Corporate Author: Alliance to End Homelessness
Subject: Housing - studies, surveys; Housing - temporary, emergency, homelessness
Publisher: Alliance to End Homelessness
Place of Publication: Ottawa
Date of Publication: 2011
Abstract: The Report Card is produced by The Alliance to End Homelessness Ottawa (ATEH), a non partisan group taking action to end homelessness, which has 75 community organizations as members. ATEH uses an annual targets table for grading which outlines definitions and change for the letter grades.
The Alliance to End Homelessness Ottawa established targets in 2009 that would be needed to end homelessness in our community by 2020 with the help of the Federal, Provincial and Municipal governments.
Language: English
Material Type: Report

Created Date Thursday, 06 October 2011
Modified Date Wednesday, 29 March 2017
Filesize 375 Kilobytes

Edmonton's 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness Year 2 Update

Title:A place to call home: Edmonton's 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness: Update year 2
Corporate Author: Edmonton Homeless Commission
Subject: Housing - affordable, social housing; Housing - temporary, emergency, homelessness
Place of Publication: Edmonton
Date of Publication: 2011
Abstract:

Two years into the implementation of our 10 Year Plan, we are achieving considerable success All of the targets that we set for Year 2 are being met or exceeded:

956 permanent homes have been secured for 1,352 people who had been homeless.

83% of people who have been housed have kept their housing.

The October 2010 Homeless Count found 2,421 homeless Edmontonians, 21% fewer than counted two years earlier.

This is the first reduction in the number of homeless since the counts began in 1999.

In the past two years, the number of Edmontonians staying in homeless shelters has dropped by 23% from an average of 1,244 per night in October 2008 to 939 per night in October 2010.

Housing First clients live in 400 different buildings run by 160 different landlords.

[Taken from front cover]

Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Thursday, 06 October 2011
Modified Date Wednesday, 29 March 2017
Filesize 982 Kilobytes

2011 Making Research Matter

Title: Making research matter: A progress report on Calgary's research agenda to end homelessness.
Corporate Author: Calgary Homeless Foundation
Subject: Housing - temporary, emergency, homelessness
Publisher: Calgary Homeless Foundation
Place of Publication: Calgary
Date of Publication: 2011
Abstract: Calgary’s 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness (10 Year Plan) was launched in 2007 by Calgary’s Committee to End Homelessness and in January of 2008, the Calgary Homeless Foundation (CHF) was chosen to lead its oversight and implementation. There were several key strategies in the original plan, including a strategy specific to data and research. To improve data and systems knowledge the CHF, in consultation with academic and community researchers, engaged in the first Calgary Homelessness Research Symposium to develop a three-year research agenda in 2009. In 2010, the CHF began further consultation with local researchers, in part through the second Homelessness Research Symposium. More than 75 local researchers, academics, service providers and government representatives were in attendance. Their input and feedback were instrumental in updating the original research agenda and in aligning future research priorities with the goals and strategies of the updated 10 Year Plan.
Language: English
Material Type: Report

Created Date Thursday, 06 October 2011
Modified Date Wednesday, 29 March 2017
Filesize 936 Kilobytes

2011 Housing Outcomes Aboriginal

Title: Improving housing outcomes for Aboriginal people in Western Canada: National, regional, community and individual perspectives on changing the future of homelessness.
Author(s):Thurston, Wilfreda E.; Oelke, Nelly D.; Turner, David; Bird, Cynthia
Corporate Author: University of Calgary; Aboriginal Friendship Centre of Calgary
Subject: Housing - planning, policy; Housing - studies, surveys; Housing - temporary, emergency, homelessness
Publisher: University of Calgary
Place of Publication: Calgary
Date of Publication: 2011
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to create a framework designed to reduce Aboriginal homelessness in Western Canada. To achieve this goal, researchers reviewed homeless reduction policies, procedures and practises of organizations in seven Western Canadian cities that deliver housing services to homeless Aboriginals.They also studied the capacity of urban organizations to collaborate on an initiative dedicated to improving housing outcomes for homeless Aboriginal people.
Notes:Prepared for Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, National Housing Secretariat.
Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Thursday, 06 October 2011
Modified Date Wednesday, 29 March 2017
Filesize 169 Kilobytes

2011 Housing and Support for Homeless Albertans

Title: Housing and supports for homeless Albertans: ending homelessness by 2019.
Corporate Author: Government of Alberta. Housing and Urban Affairs
Subject:Poverty - statistics|split|Housing - affordable, social housing; |Housing - planning, policy
Publisher: Government of Alberta
Place of Publication: Edmonton
Date of Publication: 2011
Language: English
Material Type: Fact Sheet

ESPC headquarters also feature a library, where hard-copies of a number of publications are stored. Everyone is welcome to browse the materials;memberscan borrow items.  Individuals looking for a quiet research spot or groups looking for a comfortable meeting space can contact us to book time in the library.

Hours: 9:00am–4:30pm, Monday to Friday        Photocopies: 10 cents per page.

Is there something missing from our library? Are you looking for help with your research? We'd love to hear from you!  Email johnk@edmontonsocialplanning.ca or call 780.423.2031 x 350

 

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