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F.07 CHILDREN

Documents

Created Date Friday, 12 October 2012
Filesize 384 Kilobytes

2012 Cyberbullying Relaity Check

Title:Cyberbullying: reality check.
Author(s):Knighton, Lila|split|Simon, Alisa|split|Kelly, Janice|split|Kimball, Dr. Alexandra
Corporate Author: Kids Help Phone
Subject:Children - abuse, prevention|split|Social inclusion, exclusion
Publisher:Kids Help Phone
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:2012
Abstract:

In April of 2007, Kids Help Phone published Cyber-bullying: Our Kids' New Reality. The report collected responses from over 2,500 young people on the topic of cyberbulling, which was at that time, a very new phenomenon. Since then, cyberbullying has gained significant attention in research, counselling, and educational settings. It has also becomae a well-known issue among the general public in Canada, particularly after online harrassment was implicated in the suicides of several young people in late 2010 and early 2011.

This documents is a follow-up to our 2007 report. In it, we will discuss the most recent research-based information on cyberbulling, and provide a short "then and now" overview of a more recent cyberbullying survey that we posted to our website in order to highlight some of the trends in online behaviour that our users have shared with us. The report will conclude with revisited recommendations on what adults can do to support young people as they navigate an increasingly technologically mediated social reality. [Taken from Introduction].

Language:English
Series:Kids Help Phone Research Update
Material Type:Report

Created Date Wednesday, 12 October 2011
Filesize 1.99 Megabytes

2011 Tale of Two Canadas

Title:A tale of two Canadas: implementing rights in early childhood.
Corporate Author: Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada
Coalition of Child Care Advocates of BC
Subject:Child care - Canada
Publisher:Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada
Coalition of Child Care Advocates of BC
Place of Publication:Vancouver
Date of Publication:2011
Abstract:

How is Canada doing at protecting the rights of young children? To what extent does public policy in Canada recognize the social and economic changes and challenges facing families today? This paper explores two fundamentally different answers to this question which, together, tell A Tale of Two Canadas.

Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Wednesday, 01 June 2016
Filesize 523 Kilobytes

2009 Quebec Early Childhood

 

Title:What a difference a decade makes: counting the benefits of investment in early childhood development in Quebec.
Author(s):Japel, Christa
Citation:Paediatrics & Child, Vol. 14 No. 10, December 2009
Subject:Children - services, planning|split|Child care - Canada
Publisher:Canadian Paediatric Society
Place of Publication:Montréal
Date of Publication:2009
Abstract:

Child care services in Quebec have undergone a major transformation since 1997, when the government adopted its new family policy. One of the linchpins of this innovative policy was the setting up of a network of fixed-fee services for all children aged five years and younger, irrespective of family income. The network was intended to address the issue of work-family balance and to provide children, no matter what the financial status of their parents, with a preschool environment that fosters their social, emotional and cognitive development, and prepares them for entry into the school system.
More than 10 years later, what benefits can we detect from this investment in early childhood education and care? First, we observe a sharp rise in the number of children in regulated child care. There is also evidence that this attendance is having beneficial effects on the behaviour and cognitive development of the children. These benefits are particularly evident among vulnerable children. Second, available and affordable child care accompanied by a generous parental leave program my have had an impact on Quebec's demographic profile: compared with the other provinces, Quebec has had the largest increase in its birth rate of the past five years. Furthermore, families have greatly benefited from Quebec's child care model: the increased availability of spaces has facilitated mothers' attendance at an educational institution or return to work.

Language:English
Material Type:Article


Created Date Wednesday, 01 June 2016
Filesize 1.18 Megabytes

2009 Kinship Report

 

Title:Kinship care review report
Corporate Author: Government of Alberta. Children and Youth Services
Subject:Children - child welfare system
Publisher:Government of Alberta. Children and Youth Services
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:2009
Abstract:

In February 2009, the Honourable Janis Tarchuk, Minister of Alberta Children and Youth Services, announced that the ministry was undertaking an internal review of Alberta’s Kinship Care Program to learn what is working well and what can be improved. At this time, Minister Tarchuk reaffirmed Alberta’s commitment to kinship care as a placement option that achieves positive outcomes for many vulnerable children and youth by placing them with extended family or other significant people in the child or youth’s life in a safe and nurturing environment.
This report provides an overview of the kinship care program in Alberta and considers evidence-based leading practice and cross-jurisdictional comparisons, highlighting what is working well and providing recommendations for continued improvement.

Language:English
Material Type:Report


Created Date Wednesday, 01 June 2016
Filesize 2.06 Megabytes

2009 November We Must Do Better

 

Title:We must do better: it's time to make Alberta poverty-free.
Author(s):Gurnett, Jim|split|Kolkman, John|split|Moore-Kilgannon, Bill
Subject:Poverty - child poverty
Publisher:Edmonton Social Planning Council
Public Interest Alberta
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:2009
Language:English
Material Type:Report


Created Date Tuesday, 15 March 2016
Filesize 295 Kilobytes

2008 Foster Care Review

Title:Foster care review report
Corporate Author: Alberta Children's Services
Subject:Children - child welfare system
Publisher:Alberta children's Services
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:2008
Abstract:

In response to the death of a foster child in January 2007, Janis Tarchuk, Minister of Alberta Children's Services, called for a review to examine the circumstances surrounding this tragic death, and to assess Alberta's foster care practice and standards. This review was called under the authority of section 8(2) of the Government Organization Act.

Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Thursday, 18 February 2016
Filesize 270 Kilobytes

2007 Free Lunch

Title:More than a free lunch: the effects of poverty on education outcomes.
Corporate Author: British Columbia Teachers' Federation
Subject:Poverty - child poverty|split|Education - general
Publisher:British Columbia Teachers' Federation
Place of Publication:Vancouver
Date of Publication:2007
Abstract:

Poverty and income inequality are major barriers to academic achievement. As daily mentors in the lives of their students, teachers experience the impact poverty has on the children in their care. The impact of poverty goes beyond material deprivation; it contributes to social isolation.
A fact sheet on the impact of poverty on education.

Language:English
Material Type:Fact Sheet

Created Date Thursday, 28 January 2016
Filesize 171 Kilobytes

2005 Uniting For Children

 

Title:Uniting for children 2005 forum: summary and evaluation report.
Corporate Author: Government of Alberta
Citation:Conference, May 17 and 18, 2005
Subject:Children - child welfare system
Publisher:Government of Alberta
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:2005
Abstract:

Alberta Children’s Services hosts a Children’s Forum every two years. The Uniting for Children Forum 2005 was successfully held on May 17 and 18, 2005, at the Edmonton Northlands Agricom with more than 1,200 delegates from across the province in attendance.
The forum focused on education and brought together parents, youth and service providers to share their experiences and expertise and explore new ways of working together. Participants were offered access to a range of tools, new knowledge, and resources to raise happy and healthy children. Throughout the forum, youth were actively involved in discussions about issues that affect them.

Language:English
 
Material Type:Report


Created Date Thursday, 28 January 2016
Filesize 2.12 Megabytes

2005 A Incident Study of Reported Child Abuse

Title:Alberta incidence study of reported child abuse and neglect-2003 (AIS-2003): major findings.
Author(s):MacLaurin, Bruce|split|Trocmé, Nico|split|Fallon, Barbara|split|McCormack, Megan|split|Pitman, Lisa|split|Forest, Nathalie|split|Banks, Jennifer|split|Shangreaux, Corbin|split|Perrault, Ellen
Subject:Children - child welfare system
Publisher:University of Calgary. Faculty of Social Work.
Place of Publication:Calgary
Date of Publication:2005
Abstract:

The Alberta Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (AIS-2003) is the first provincewide study to examine the incidence of reported child maltreatment and the characteristics of the children and families investigated by Alberta child welfare services. The AIS-2003 tracked 2,653 child maltreatment investigations conducted in a representative sample of 11 Child Welfare Service Areas across Alberta in the fall of 2003.

Language:English
 
Material Type:Report

Created Date Wednesday, 23 September 2015
Filesize 476 Kilobytes

1999 October First Circle Uniting for Children - Poverty and Physical Needs

Title:Poverty & physical needs : 3 good ideas.
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Citation:Alberta Children's Forum : First Circle : Uniting for Children
Subject:Poverty - child poverty|split|Housing - Edmonton - housing costs
Publisher:Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:1999
Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Thursday, 17 September 2015
Filesize 182 Kilobytes

1998 May A Review of the Government Sanctioned Coopers and Lybrand Study-State of the Child Welfare Program

Title:A review of the government sanctioned Coopers & Lybrand study : State of the child welfare program.
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Subject:Children - child welfare system
Publisher:Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:1998
Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Tuesday, 25 August 2015
Filesize 1.38 Megabytes

1998 Children's Services Redesign in Alberta

Title:Children's services redesign in Alberta
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Subject:Children - services, planning
Publisher:Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:1998
Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Tuesday, 25 August 2015
Filesize 224 Kilobytes

1998 April the redesign of child and family services_a frontline perspective

Title:The redesign of child and family services : a frontline perspective.
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Subject:Children - services, planning
Publisher:Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:1998
Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Tuesday, 25 August 2015
Filesize 1.89 Megabytes

1996 June First Reading - The Path to New Children's Services

Created Date Wednesday, 15 July 2015
Filesize 441 Kilobytes

1992 Child Poverty and Child Welfare Literature Review

Title:Child poverty and child welfare literature review
Author(s):Fitzpatrick, Anne
Subject:Poverty - child poverty
Publisher:Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:1992
Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Thursday, 09 July 2015
Filesize 269 Kilobytes

1991 March Child Poverty - Whose Baby Is It

Title:Child poverty : whose baby is it?
Author(s):Hyndman, Jennifer
Citation:Submitted to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health and Welfare, Social Affairs, Seniors and the Status of Women
Subject:Poverty - child poverty
Publisher:Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:1991
Language:English

Click here to see document
Material Type:Report

Created Date Thursday, 09 July 2015
Filesize 1.38 Megabytes

1990 October Special Project - Child Poverty Interagency for 1990

Title:Special project : child poverty interagency for 1990.
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Subject:Poverty - child poverty
Publisher:Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:1989
Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Wednesday, 24 June 2015
Filesize 1.08 Megabytes

1990 July Head Start - Investing Today in Albertas Tomorrow

Title:Head start : investing today in Alberta's tomorrow.
Corporate Author: The Child Poverty Action Group
Subject:Education - general
Publisher:Edmonton City Centre Church Corporation
Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:1990
Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Wednesday, 24 June 2015
Filesize 160 Kilobytes

1990 July - Alberta Facts - Children in Poverty - On the Outside Looking In

Created Date Monday, 24 November 2014
Filesize 3.38 Megabytes

No Change - After 25 years of promises it's time to eliminate child poverty

The Edmonton Social Planning Council, the Alberta College of Social Workers and Public Interest Alberta released a new report, “No Change: After 25 years of Promises it is Time to Eliminate Child Poverty” on the 25th anniversary of the all party House of Commons vote to eliminate child poverty by the year 2000.
The report shows that 143,200 children in Alberta lived below the low-income measure (LIM After Tax) in 2012. This represents 16.2% of all children, practically ‘no change’ from 1989 (16.4%). In fact, with Alberta’s population growth, there are 28,670 more children in poverty in Alberta than in 1989.
“The statistics come from federal taxfiler data (Statistics Canada has cut the data source that has been used for years - the SLID) so this provides a much more accurate and detailed picture of poverty in Alberta and Canada,” explains John Kolkman, the main report author and Research Coordinator of the Edmonton Social Planning Council. "The taxfiler data is more accurate because it includes families with a lower socio-economic status who are missed in surveys because of language barriers or not having a phone, and children and youth living on First Nations."
The report shows that despite Alberta’s strong economy, Alberta’s income inequality has increased faster than the national average, with the top 1% of earners seeing real income gains of over 60% since 1982 while the bottom half of income earners only saw a tiny gain of 3.4%.
“With close to 60% of children living in poverty having at least one parent working full time, full year, we need to be considering living wage policies that will assure that people working full time are not living in poverty,” said Bill Moore-Kilgannon, Executive Director of Public Interest Alberta. “By re-establishing a progressive tax system, Alberta could easily afford to invest in the public services that prevent and reduce poverty and in a child tax benefit that that would lift many families out of poverty.”
The report calls on the government to establish a comprehensive poverty reduction strategy that includes increasing investments in many current strategies that are proven to reduce poverty and to make new commitments to policies and services like quality childcare and affordable housing that support families to get out of poverty.
The Alberta government’s plan to eliminate child poverty is long overdue,” says Lori Sigurdson, Manager, Professional Affairs of the Alberta College of Social Workers. “We know how to achieve this. Our report details key policy initiatives that would lift Alberta families out of poverty and reduce much suffering. Sadly, what seems to be missing is the political will to make this a priority.”
The report shows that child poverty is directly related to the systemic issues that create barriers and impact women, immigrants, aboriginal peoples and people with health issues. For example 69% of low wage-workers (less than $16/hour) are women, and women still only make around 60% on average in Alberta of what a man earns.
“We know that when women are poor, the children they care for are also poor,” said Rhoda Mitchell, Social Issues Coordinator at the Women’s Centre of Calgary. “Women living in poverty have identified priority solutions: increase income, increase access to affordable childcare, and strengthen Alberta’s social infrastructure. We believe that ending child poverty lies in ending women’s poverty.”
While the new child poverty numbers now include families on reserve it is not possible to determine from the taxfiler data the exact number of children on first nation’s reserves living in poverty. However, we do know that a significant reason for the very high numbers of children in poverty is related to the systemic discrimination and mistreatment of FNMI peoples that must be addressed in Alberta’s comprehensive poverty strategy.
“Child poverty in the Aboriginal community is a serious issue that negatively affects our future leaders,” said Rachelle Venne, CEO of the Institute for the Advancement of Aboriginal Women. “Collaborative, multi-stakeholder initiatives such as the City of Edmonton's Taskforce on Eliminating Poverty which has a specific engagement process with the Aboriginal community is what is needed for the systemic and long term change that is necessary for the future.”
"I am appalled to know that there are so many hungry and homeless children in our rich province," said Sandra Burgess, with the Child Well-being Initiative. “As a parent and dietitian who spent my career on food issues, I cannot understand why our government and other citizens don’t see that unmet needs of impoverished kids constitute an emergency.”

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