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Our Resource section is an information hub for Alberta's third sector. We collect publications for, by, and about nonprofits and social services in our province. Start your search using keywords in the search box below or browse the various categories.

 

F.04 POVERTY

Documents

Created Date Thursday, 09 February 2017
Filesize 6.68 Megabytes

The End Poverty Action Guide for Religious and Spiritual Communities

Download The End Poverty Action Guide for Religious and Spiritual Communities, co-produced by EndPovertyEdmonton, the Anglican Foundation and the Capital Region Interfaith Housing Initiative. The Action Guide will provide real-life stories from a variety of faith communities in Edmonton that will highlight how both individuals and communities can take action to make a difference in the fight against poverty.

Created Date Friday, 12 October 2012
Filesize 153 Kilobytes

2012 AB Poverty Progress Profile

Title:Alberta poverty progress profile
Variant Title:May 2012
Corporate Author: Canada Without Poverty
Subject:Poverty - planning, policy|split|Poverty - programs, services
Publisher:Canada Without Poverty
Place of Publication:Ottawa
Date of Publication:2012
Abstract:

Alberta has faced a history of economic booms and busts for decades. Generally, the wealthier Albertans profit from strong provincial economic growth while middle and lower income Albertans struggle with income security, low personal disposable income, lack of social cohesion, and unaffordable housing. One in ten Albertan children live in poverty – about 73,000 children. Approximately, 24, 695 children living in poverty have either one or both parents working full time, full year which means, having a job is no longer a way out of poverty. Alberta’s living costs, especially for housing, are amongst the highest in Canada, which means an additional burden on low income families. Currently, Alberta does not have a provincial poverty plan to reduce and eliminate poverty, however on April 11, 2012, Premier Alison Redford was elected on a promise to develop an ambitious poverty reduction plan. The two main goals were to eliminate child poverty in 5 years and poverty in 10 years. The plan is now in development.

Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Wednesday, 12 October 2011
Filesize 281 Kilobytes

2011 Alberta and Grande Prairie Athabasca Peace River

Title:Statistics of low-wage workers in Alberta: [Alberta and Grande Prairie, Athabasca and Peace River Region : 2011]
Corporate Author: Public Interest Alberta
Subject:Poverty - working poor|split|Poverty - statistics|split|Women - poverty
Publisher:Public Interest Alberta
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:2011
Language:English
Series:Statistics of low-wage workers in Alberta

Material Type:Fact Sheet

Created Date Thursday, 23 June 2016
Filesize 428 Kilobytes

More than Minimum: Edmonton's Living Wage Report: 2016 Update

The living wage is meant to provide families with basic economic stability and maintain a modest standard of living.The living wage, unlike the minimum wage, is the actual amount that earners need to make to be able to live in a specific community.

The 2016 living wage for Edmonton is $16.69 per hour. This is the amount that a family of four with two parents who work full-time require to live in economic stability and maintain a modest standard of living. This includes being able to afford basic necessities (food, shelter, utilities, clothing, transportation, etc.), to support healthy child development, to avoid financial stress, and to participate in their communities.

The living wage for Edmonton was first calculated in 2015. Each year the living wage is updated to reflect social and economic changes. Since last year, Edmonton’s living wage rate dropped by $0.67. The drop in the living wage is due to changes in government taxes and transfers, particularly in increased benefits through the new Canada Child Benefit (CCB) as well as the Enhanced Alberta Family Employment Tax Credit (AFETC).

Moving forward, the ESPC hopes to work alongside stakeholders and community partners, including the City of Edmonton, to begin the process of formally recognizing living wage employers.

Created Date Thursday, 18 February 2016
Filesize 501 Kilobytes

2007 Panhandling – Winnipeg

Title:Panhandling in Winnipeg: Legislation vs support services : volume 1 : executive summary.

Author(s):Carter, Tom|split|Friesen, Anita|split|Polevychok, Chesya|split|Osborne, John
Subject:Employment - general|split|Unemployment - general|split|Urban issues - general
Publisher:University of Winnipeg
Place of Publication:Winnipeg
Date of Publication:2007
Abstract:

Panhandling, the act of stopping people on the street or in public or private spaces to ask for food or money, has long been part of the urban environment. The activity generates various reactions from people: some see it as a sign of poverty and lack of services including affordable housing for marginalized groups. Others view it as having a negative effect on businesses. Some perceive panhandling to be the outcome of alcohol and substance abuse; the result of family breakdown; or as the actions of those unable or unwilling to sustain themselves by other activities.
The negative reaction to panhandling by a substantial proportion of the public has prompted legislation to either control and/or eliminate panhandling. In response, the City of Winnipeg passed legislation that prohibits some methods of panhandling, and places restrictions on some aspects of panhandling activity, particularly as it relates to specific types of services or locations in the city. This project is designed to answer the following questions regarding the need for, and the effectiveness of, this legislation:
1. given the nature, number and activity of panhandlers in the city, is this legislation an appropriate response to the circumstances?
2. based on the results of this research and the experience of other cities, is the legislation likely to be effective? and,
3. drawing on the findings of the research and experience in other cities, are there more effective means of addressing the issues of panhandling? Is legislation the answer or should the focus be on services and programs to address systemic problems that lead to panhandling in the first place?

Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Thursday, 26 November 2015
Filesize 125 Kilobytes

2004 September More Money in Their Pockets - Pragmatism, Politics and Poverty in Alberta

Title:More money in their pockets : pragmatism, politics and poverty in Alberta: why ESPC challenges Alberta to adopt the market basket measure.
Author(s):O'Hara, Philip
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Subject:Poverty - planning, policy
Publisher:Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:2004
Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Thursday, 26 November 2015
Filesize 104 Kilobytes

2004 November Child and Family Poverty in Alberta 2004

Created Date Thursday, 26 November 2015
Filesize 1005 Kilobytes

2000 February No Safeguards - A Profile of Urban Poverty in Alberta

Title:No safeguards: a profile of urban poverty in Alberta.
Corporate Author: Community Services Consulting Ltd.
Subject:Poverty - general
Publisher:Inter City Forum on Social Policy
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:2000
Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Wednesday, 23 September 2015
Filesize 152 Kilobytes

1999 October First Circle Uniting for Children - Poverty and Physical Needs The Missing Action Steps

Title:The OTHER children's forum report : poverty & physical needs : the missing action steps.
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Citation:Alberta Children's Forum : First Circle : Uniting for Children
Subject:Poverty - child poverty
Publisher:Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:1999
Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Thursday, 17 September 2015
Filesize 672 Kilobytes

1998 Summer Literature Review of the Two Baskets Measure Approach to Poverty

Title:Literature review of the two baskets measure approach to poverty
Author(s):Salegio, Julius
Subject:Poverty - planning, policy
Publisher:Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:1998
Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Tuesday, 25 August 2015
Filesize 565 Kilobytes

1998 February Poverty Lines in Canada - A Review of the Literature

Title:Poverty lines in Canada : a review of the literature.
Author(s):Brown, Jason|split|Marangoni, Isabel
Subject:Poverty - general
Publisher:Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:1998
Abstract:

A review of poverty measures

Language:English
Material Type:Report

Created Date Tuesday, 25 August 2015
Filesize 347 Kilobytes

1997 October Poverty Trends in Edmonton - The Race to the Bottom Heats Up

Title:Poverty trends & the labour market in Edmonton : the race to the bottom heats up!
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Subject:Poverty - statistics|split|Employment - general
Publisher:Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:1997
Language:English
Edition:October 1997 edition
Material Type:Report

Created Date Tuesday, 25 August 2015
Filesize 2.72 Megabytes

1997 June First Reading - Putting Kids First - Attacking Child Poverty

Created Date Tuesday, 25 August 2015
Filesize 675 Kilobytes

1997 December Edmonton Facts Poverty Trends in Edmonton

Created Date Thursday, 23 July 2015
Filesize 1.40 Megabytes

1993 December First Reading - Empty Stockings

Created Date Thursday, 09 July 2015
Filesize 1.76 Megabytes

1991 September Tracking The Trends - Special Feature on Immigrants

Title:Tracking the trends : future directions for human services in Edmonton : special feature on immigrants.
Corporate Author: Edmonton Social Planning Council
Subject:Immigration - statistics, studies|split|Statistics - Edmonton
Publisher:Edmonton Social Planning Council
Place of Publication:Edmonton
Date of Publication:1991
Language:English
Series:Tracking the Trends
Material Type:Report

ESPC headquarters also feature a library, where hard-copies of a number of publications are stored. Everyone is welcome to browse the materials;memberscan borrow items.  Individuals looking for a quiet research spot or groups looking for a comfortable meeting space can contact us to book time in the library.

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