Title:Educational pathways and academic performance of youth of immigrant origin in Toronto
Author(s):Anisef, Paul|split|Brown, Robert|split|Sweet, Robert|split|Walters, David
Subject:Education – general|split|Immigration – general|split|Youth – programs, services
Publisher:Ryerson University, School of Early Childhood Education
Place of Publication:Toronto
Date of Publication:2010
Abstract:

This paper examines the educational pathways of a cohort of students who started high school in fall 2000 within the Toronto District Board of Education (TDSB) and is derived from a larger pan-Canadian study of students in Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver who were expected to graduate in 2004 if they did not experience delays. Male students – those who entered high school a year older than the average age, those who moved between schools, those who come from socio-economically disadvantaged backgrounds, and those who attended socio-economically disadvantaged schools – were less likely to graduate, regardless of language. The fact that ESL instruction for non-English speakers is negatively associated with graduation suggests that such assistance is not sufficient to attain necessary achievement levels. Immigrant students whose language is not English were more likely to graduate; however, being an English-speaking immigrant (especially one from the Caribbean) is a risk factor. Being enrolled in a school with a high level of non-English speakers is positively associated with graduation.

Language:English
Series:CERIS Working Paper No. 82
Material Type:Report

F. SOCIAL ISSUES/F06 IMMIGRATION/2010 educational_pathways.pdf

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